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Guy Fieri to Open New York Restaurant

Guy Fieri to Open New York Restaurant


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He's setting up shop in Times Square

Guy Fieri, Opening New York City Restaurant

It's just a week of good news for Guy Fieri, who recently anounced he'll be pacing the Indy 500 race this year.

The host of food show Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives is apparently making his way to New York City, opening Guy's American Kitchen and Bar in Times Square in fall 2012.

The New York Times reports that it will be a new concept located at 220 West 44th Street, and past news tells us we don't have to worry about Fieri's sushi-barbecue fusionchanging up the restaurant scene. At least he'll be contained in the tourist mecca, rather than the West Village.

Update: Grub Street reports that Fieri's new restaurant will be in the Times building, with three floors, some 500 seats, three full bars, and signature beers brewed specifically for Fieri.


10 Dishes That Made My Career: Guy Fieri

Through more than 70 installments of our 10 Dishes series, we’ve sat down with some of the most illustrious minds in the culinary world and asked them to recount the meals that shaped their careers. Tosi. Boulud. Crenn. Puck. All kings and queens of the kitchen realm. But while we’re intrigued by what makes these leaders of gastronomy tick, we’re equally fascinated by other forms of culinary influence—the fast-food savant who invented stuffed-crust pizza and the McGriddle, for example, and today’s special guest: Guy Fieri. The man who Drake calls “magician in the kitchen” has a direct line to millions of Americans through his ever-popular TV shows, and a burgeoning restaurant empire suggests that Donkey Sauce and BBQ pork sushi rolls aren’t going anywhere soon.

The Nor-Cal native burst onto the scene in 2006 after crushing The Next Food Network Star challenge. But it was his follow-up series—Diners Drive-ins and Dives, in which he traversed the country in a vintage Chevy Camaro convertible to track down the mom-and-pop restaurantsਊmericathat minted him as a household name. In Fieri’s estimation, he’s visited close to 900 restaurants.

Fieri says that seeing the TV cameras roll up �lt like winning the lottery” for the independent, small-time joints featured on “Triple-D,”਋ut he also realized the broader influence of the show𠅊nd his own on-screen persona𠅊s it went on. “I just remember pulling into a town, and a lady brought her three kids [to where we were filming],” he says. “They all had their hair spiked and sunglasses and were wearing shorts. And I’m like, wait a second. I always wanted to be the Six Million Dollar Man. Now you’ve got kids wanting to be the Diners, Drive-ins and Dives guy.”

[The New York Times Review] wasn’t going to change me. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.

Similar show concepts have existed in the past,਋ut Fieri’s love-it-or-hate-it flair—the moxie to rock frosty tips and forearm sweat bands in the late aughts his easy਌onversational flow and wisecracks his beer-drinking buddy charisma𠅊llowed him to appeal at a much deeper level to millions of Sammy Hagar fans and stay-at-home moms alike. “Honestly, brother, I wish there was something to tell you that was predetermined, or that I have a style,” says Fieri about his sartorial choices. “My style is comfortable.” The same level of comfort extends to his anything-goes approach to cooking—how else would you explain preparing aꂺtch of nachos in a trashcan in front of thousands of fans?

As the show grew in popularity and spawned endless reruns on The Food Network, the cult of Triple-D grew. Catchphrases like 𠇏lavortown” infiltrated every corner of pop culture, and seemingly everyone wanted a piece. Action Bronson and Drake paid small tributes Seth Rogen and James Franco recruited him for The Interview (“That was such a cool thing because you know what it was for? Peace in the Middle East through food.”) Instagram posts from Barry Bonds and 50 Cent made the Internet rounds. All the while, Fieri weathered the Saturday Night Live skitsਊnd relentless meme-ification with such good humor that it practically made him untouchable.

That transcendent Main Street appeal became particularly useful in 2012, when New York Times਌ritic Pete Wells famously used the celebrity chef as a whipping boy in his viral review of Guy Fieri’s Bar + Kitchen in Times Square, setting him up as a representative of all that’s wrong in food. “That wasn’t going to change me,” he says. “I am the way I am and the way I’ve always been. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.”

From family treks into the Marble Mountains, to his days as a charismatic flambé captain,ਏieri shares the 10 dishes that paved his path to Flavortown.


10 Dishes That Made My Career: Guy Fieri

Through more than 70 installments of our 10 Dishes series, we’ve sat down with some of the most illustrious minds in the culinary world and asked them to recount the meals that shaped their careers. Tosi. Boulud. Crenn. Puck. All kings and queens of the kitchen realm. But while we’re intrigued by what makes these leaders of gastronomy tick, we’re equally fascinated by other forms of culinary influence—the fast-food savant who invented stuffed-crust pizza and the McGriddle, for example, and today’s special guest: Guy Fieri. The man who Drake calls “magician in the kitchen” has a direct line to millions of Americans through his ever-popular TV shows, and a burgeoning restaurant empire suggests that Donkey Sauce and BBQ pork sushi rolls aren’t going anywhere soon.

The Nor-Cal native burst onto the scene in 2006 after crushing The Next Food Network Star challenge. But it was his follow-up series—Diners Drive-ins and Dives, in which he traversed the country in a vintage Chevy Camaro convertible to track down the mom-and-pop restaurantsਊmericathat minted him as a household name. In Fieri’s estimation, he’s visited close to 900 restaurants.

Fieri says that seeing the TV cameras roll up �lt like winning the lottery” for the independent, small-time joints featured on “Triple-D,”਋ut he also realized the broader influence of the show𠅊nd his own on-screen persona𠅊s it went on. “I just remember pulling into a town, and a lady brought her three kids [to where we were filming],” he says. “They all had their hair spiked and sunglasses and were wearing shorts. And I’m like, wait a second. I always wanted to be the Six Million Dollar Man. Now you’ve got kids wanting to be the Diners, Drive-ins and Dives guy.”

[The New York Times Review] wasn’t going to change me. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.

Similar show concepts have existed in the past,਋ut Fieri’s love-it-or-hate-it flair—the moxie to rock frosty tips and forearm sweat bands in the late aughts his easy਌onversational flow and wisecracks his beer-drinking buddy charisma𠅊llowed him to appeal at a much deeper level to millions of Sammy Hagar fans and stay-at-home moms alike. “Honestly, brother, I wish there was something to tell you that was predetermined, or that I have a style,” says Fieri about his sartorial choices. “My style is comfortable.” The same level of comfort extends to his anything-goes approach to cooking—how else would you explain preparing aꂺtch of nachos in a trashcan in front of thousands of fans?

As the show grew in popularity and spawned endless reruns on The Food Network, the cult of Triple-D grew. Catchphrases like 𠇏lavortown” infiltrated every corner of pop culture, and seemingly everyone wanted a piece. Action Bronson and Drake paid small tributes Seth Rogen and James Franco recruited him for The Interview (“That was such a cool thing because you know what it was for? Peace in the Middle East through food.”) Instagram posts from Barry Bonds and 50 Cent made the Internet rounds. All the while, Fieri weathered the Saturday Night Live skitsਊnd relentless meme-ification with such good humor that it practically made him untouchable.

That transcendent Main Street appeal became particularly useful in 2012, when New York Times਌ritic Pete Wells famously used the celebrity chef as a whipping boy in his viral review of Guy Fieri’s Bar + Kitchen in Times Square, setting him up as a representative of all that’s wrong in food. “That wasn’t going to change me,” he says. “I am the way I am and the way I’ve always been. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.”

From family treks into the Marble Mountains, to his days as a charismatic flambé captain,ਏieri shares the 10 dishes that paved his path to Flavortown.


10 Dishes That Made My Career: Guy Fieri

Through more than 70 installments of our 10 Dishes series, we’ve sat down with some of the most illustrious minds in the culinary world and asked them to recount the meals that shaped their careers. Tosi. Boulud. Crenn. Puck. All kings and queens of the kitchen realm. But while we’re intrigued by what makes these leaders of gastronomy tick, we’re equally fascinated by other forms of culinary influence—the fast-food savant who invented stuffed-crust pizza and the McGriddle, for example, and today’s special guest: Guy Fieri. The man who Drake calls “magician in the kitchen” has a direct line to millions of Americans through his ever-popular TV shows, and a burgeoning restaurant empire suggests that Donkey Sauce and BBQ pork sushi rolls aren’t going anywhere soon.

The Nor-Cal native burst onto the scene in 2006 after crushing The Next Food Network Star challenge. But it was his follow-up series—Diners Drive-ins and Dives, in which he traversed the country in a vintage Chevy Camaro convertible to track down the mom-and-pop restaurantsਊmericathat minted him as a household name. In Fieri’s estimation, he’s visited close to 900 restaurants.

Fieri says that seeing the TV cameras roll up �lt like winning the lottery” for the independent, small-time joints featured on “Triple-D,”਋ut he also realized the broader influence of the show𠅊nd his own on-screen persona𠅊s it went on. “I just remember pulling into a town, and a lady brought her three kids [to where we were filming],” he says. “They all had their hair spiked and sunglasses and were wearing shorts. And I’m like, wait a second. I always wanted to be the Six Million Dollar Man. Now you’ve got kids wanting to be the Diners, Drive-ins and Dives guy.”

[The New York Times Review] wasn’t going to change me. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.

Similar show concepts have existed in the past,਋ut Fieri’s love-it-or-hate-it flair—the moxie to rock frosty tips and forearm sweat bands in the late aughts his easy਌onversational flow and wisecracks his beer-drinking buddy charisma𠅊llowed him to appeal at a much deeper level to millions of Sammy Hagar fans and stay-at-home moms alike. “Honestly, brother, I wish there was something to tell you that was predetermined, or that I have a style,” says Fieri about his sartorial choices. “My style is comfortable.” The same level of comfort extends to his anything-goes approach to cooking—how else would you explain preparing aꂺtch of nachos in a trashcan in front of thousands of fans?

As the show grew in popularity and spawned endless reruns on The Food Network, the cult of Triple-D grew. Catchphrases like 𠇏lavortown” infiltrated every corner of pop culture, and seemingly everyone wanted a piece. Action Bronson and Drake paid small tributes Seth Rogen and James Franco recruited him for The Interview (“That was such a cool thing because you know what it was for? Peace in the Middle East through food.”) Instagram posts from Barry Bonds and 50 Cent made the Internet rounds. All the while, Fieri weathered the Saturday Night Live skitsਊnd relentless meme-ification with such good humor that it practically made him untouchable.

That transcendent Main Street appeal became particularly useful in 2012, when New York Times਌ritic Pete Wells famously used the celebrity chef as a whipping boy in his viral review of Guy Fieri’s Bar + Kitchen in Times Square, setting him up as a representative of all that’s wrong in food. “That wasn’t going to change me,” he says. “I am the way I am and the way I’ve always been. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.”

From family treks into the Marble Mountains, to his days as a charismatic flambé captain,ਏieri shares the 10 dishes that paved his path to Flavortown.


10 Dishes That Made My Career: Guy Fieri

Through more than 70 installments of our 10 Dishes series, we’ve sat down with some of the most illustrious minds in the culinary world and asked them to recount the meals that shaped their careers. Tosi. Boulud. Crenn. Puck. All kings and queens of the kitchen realm. But while we’re intrigued by what makes these leaders of gastronomy tick, we’re equally fascinated by other forms of culinary influence—the fast-food savant who invented stuffed-crust pizza and the McGriddle, for example, and today’s special guest: Guy Fieri. The man who Drake calls “magician in the kitchen” has a direct line to millions of Americans through his ever-popular TV shows, and a burgeoning restaurant empire suggests that Donkey Sauce and BBQ pork sushi rolls aren’t going anywhere soon.

The Nor-Cal native burst onto the scene in 2006 after crushing The Next Food Network Star challenge. But it was his follow-up series—Diners Drive-ins and Dives, in which he traversed the country in a vintage Chevy Camaro convertible to track down the mom-and-pop restaurantsਊmericathat minted him as a household name. In Fieri’s estimation, he’s visited close to 900 restaurants.

Fieri says that seeing the TV cameras roll up �lt like winning the lottery” for the independent, small-time joints featured on “Triple-D,”਋ut he also realized the broader influence of the show𠅊nd his own on-screen persona𠅊s it went on. “I just remember pulling into a town, and a lady brought her three kids [to where we were filming],” he says. “They all had their hair spiked and sunglasses and were wearing shorts. And I’m like, wait a second. I always wanted to be the Six Million Dollar Man. Now you’ve got kids wanting to be the Diners, Drive-ins and Dives guy.”

[The New York Times Review] wasn’t going to change me. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.

Similar show concepts have existed in the past,਋ut Fieri’s love-it-or-hate-it flair—the moxie to rock frosty tips and forearm sweat bands in the late aughts his easy਌onversational flow and wisecracks his beer-drinking buddy charisma𠅊llowed him to appeal at a much deeper level to millions of Sammy Hagar fans and stay-at-home moms alike. “Honestly, brother, I wish there was something to tell you that was predetermined, or that I have a style,” says Fieri about his sartorial choices. “My style is comfortable.” The same level of comfort extends to his anything-goes approach to cooking—how else would you explain preparing aꂺtch of nachos in a trashcan in front of thousands of fans?

As the show grew in popularity and spawned endless reruns on The Food Network, the cult of Triple-D grew. Catchphrases like 𠇏lavortown” infiltrated every corner of pop culture, and seemingly everyone wanted a piece. Action Bronson and Drake paid small tributes Seth Rogen and James Franco recruited him for The Interview (“That was such a cool thing because you know what it was for? Peace in the Middle East through food.”) Instagram posts from Barry Bonds and 50 Cent made the Internet rounds. All the while, Fieri weathered the Saturday Night Live skitsਊnd relentless meme-ification with such good humor that it practically made him untouchable.

That transcendent Main Street appeal became particularly useful in 2012, when New York Times਌ritic Pete Wells famously used the celebrity chef as a whipping boy in his viral review of Guy Fieri’s Bar + Kitchen in Times Square, setting him up as a representative of all that’s wrong in food. “That wasn’t going to change me,” he says. “I am the way I am and the way I’ve always been. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.”

From family treks into the Marble Mountains, to his days as a charismatic flambé captain,ਏieri shares the 10 dishes that paved his path to Flavortown.


10 Dishes That Made My Career: Guy Fieri

Through more than 70 installments of our 10 Dishes series, we’ve sat down with some of the most illustrious minds in the culinary world and asked them to recount the meals that shaped their careers. Tosi. Boulud. Crenn. Puck. All kings and queens of the kitchen realm. But while we’re intrigued by what makes these leaders of gastronomy tick, we’re equally fascinated by other forms of culinary influence—the fast-food savant who invented stuffed-crust pizza and the McGriddle, for example, and today’s special guest: Guy Fieri. The man who Drake calls “magician in the kitchen” has a direct line to millions of Americans through his ever-popular TV shows, and a burgeoning restaurant empire suggests that Donkey Sauce and BBQ pork sushi rolls aren’t going anywhere soon.

The Nor-Cal native burst onto the scene in 2006 after crushing The Next Food Network Star challenge. But it was his follow-up series—Diners Drive-ins and Dives, in which he traversed the country in a vintage Chevy Camaro convertible to track down the mom-and-pop restaurantsਊmericathat minted him as a household name. In Fieri’s estimation, he’s visited close to 900 restaurants.

Fieri says that seeing the TV cameras roll up �lt like winning the lottery” for the independent, small-time joints featured on “Triple-D,”਋ut he also realized the broader influence of the show𠅊nd his own on-screen persona𠅊s it went on. “I just remember pulling into a town, and a lady brought her three kids [to where we were filming],” he says. “They all had their hair spiked and sunglasses and were wearing shorts. And I’m like, wait a second. I always wanted to be the Six Million Dollar Man. Now you’ve got kids wanting to be the Diners, Drive-ins and Dives guy.”

[The New York Times Review] wasn’t going to change me. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.

Similar show concepts have existed in the past,਋ut Fieri’s love-it-or-hate-it flair—the moxie to rock frosty tips and forearm sweat bands in the late aughts his easy਌onversational flow and wisecracks his beer-drinking buddy charisma𠅊llowed him to appeal at a much deeper level to millions of Sammy Hagar fans and stay-at-home moms alike. “Honestly, brother, I wish there was something to tell you that was predetermined, or that I have a style,” says Fieri about his sartorial choices. “My style is comfortable.” The same level of comfort extends to his anything-goes approach to cooking—how else would you explain preparing aꂺtch of nachos in a trashcan in front of thousands of fans?

As the show grew in popularity and spawned endless reruns on The Food Network, the cult of Triple-D grew. Catchphrases like 𠇏lavortown” infiltrated every corner of pop culture, and seemingly everyone wanted a piece. Action Bronson and Drake paid small tributes Seth Rogen and James Franco recruited him for The Interview (“That was such a cool thing because you know what it was for? Peace in the Middle East through food.”) Instagram posts from Barry Bonds and 50 Cent made the Internet rounds. All the while, Fieri weathered the Saturday Night Live skitsਊnd relentless meme-ification with such good humor that it practically made him untouchable.

That transcendent Main Street appeal became particularly useful in 2012, when New York Times਌ritic Pete Wells famously used the celebrity chef as a whipping boy in his viral review of Guy Fieri’s Bar + Kitchen in Times Square, setting him up as a representative of all that’s wrong in food. “That wasn’t going to change me,” he says. “I am the way I am and the way I’ve always been. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.”

From family treks into the Marble Mountains, to his days as a charismatic flambé captain,ਏieri shares the 10 dishes that paved his path to Flavortown.


10 Dishes That Made My Career: Guy Fieri

Through more than 70 installments of our 10 Dishes series, we’ve sat down with some of the most illustrious minds in the culinary world and asked them to recount the meals that shaped their careers. Tosi. Boulud. Crenn. Puck. All kings and queens of the kitchen realm. But while we’re intrigued by what makes these leaders of gastronomy tick, we’re equally fascinated by other forms of culinary influence—the fast-food savant who invented stuffed-crust pizza and the McGriddle, for example, and today’s special guest: Guy Fieri. The man who Drake calls “magician in the kitchen” has a direct line to millions of Americans through his ever-popular TV shows, and a burgeoning restaurant empire suggests that Donkey Sauce and BBQ pork sushi rolls aren’t going anywhere soon.

The Nor-Cal native burst onto the scene in 2006 after crushing The Next Food Network Star challenge. But it was his follow-up series—Diners Drive-ins and Dives, in which he traversed the country in a vintage Chevy Camaro convertible to track down the mom-and-pop restaurantsਊmericathat minted him as a household name. In Fieri’s estimation, he’s visited close to 900 restaurants.

Fieri says that seeing the TV cameras roll up �lt like winning the lottery” for the independent, small-time joints featured on “Triple-D,”਋ut he also realized the broader influence of the show𠅊nd his own on-screen persona𠅊s it went on. “I just remember pulling into a town, and a lady brought her three kids [to where we were filming],” he says. “They all had their hair spiked and sunglasses and were wearing shorts. And I’m like, wait a second. I always wanted to be the Six Million Dollar Man. Now you’ve got kids wanting to be the Diners, Drive-ins and Dives guy.”

[The New York Times Review] wasn’t going to change me. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.

Similar show concepts have existed in the past,਋ut Fieri’s love-it-or-hate-it flair—the moxie to rock frosty tips and forearm sweat bands in the late aughts his easy਌onversational flow and wisecracks his beer-drinking buddy charisma𠅊llowed him to appeal at a much deeper level to millions of Sammy Hagar fans and stay-at-home moms alike. “Honestly, brother, I wish there was something to tell you that was predetermined, or that I have a style,” says Fieri about his sartorial choices. “My style is comfortable.” The same level of comfort extends to his anything-goes approach to cooking—how else would you explain preparing aꂺtch of nachos in a trashcan in front of thousands of fans?

As the show grew in popularity and spawned endless reruns on The Food Network, the cult of Triple-D grew. Catchphrases like 𠇏lavortown” infiltrated every corner of pop culture, and seemingly everyone wanted a piece. Action Bronson and Drake paid small tributes Seth Rogen and James Franco recruited him for The Interview (“That was such a cool thing because you know what it was for? Peace in the Middle East through food.”) Instagram posts from Barry Bonds and 50 Cent made the Internet rounds. All the while, Fieri weathered the Saturday Night Live skitsਊnd relentless meme-ification with such good humor that it practically made him untouchable.

That transcendent Main Street appeal became particularly useful in 2012, when New York Times਌ritic Pete Wells famously used the celebrity chef as a whipping boy in his viral review of Guy Fieri’s Bar + Kitchen in Times Square, setting him up as a representative of all that’s wrong in food. “That wasn’t going to change me,” he says. “I am the way I am and the way I’ve always been. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.”

From family treks into the Marble Mountains, to his days as a charismatic flambé captain,ਏieri shares the 10 dishes that paved his path to Flavortown.


10 Dishes That Made My Career: Guy Fieri

Through more than 70 installments of our 10 Dishes series, we’ve sat down with some of the most illustrious minds in the culinary world and asked them to recount the meals that shaped their careers. Tosi. Boulud. Crenn. Puck. All kings and queens of the kitchen realm. But while we’re intrigued by what makes these leaders of gastronomy tick, we’re equally fascinated by other forms of culinary influence—the fast-food savant who invented stuffed-crust pizza and the McGriddle, for example, and today’s special guest: Guy Fieri. The man who Drake calls “magician in the kitchen” has a direct line to millions of Americans through his ever-popular TV shows, and a burgeoning restaurant empire suggests that Donkey Sauce and BBQ pork sushi rolls aren’t going anywhere soon.

The Nor-Cal native burst onto the scene in 2006 after crushing The Next Food Network Star challenge. But it was his follow-up series—Diners Drive-ins and Dives, in which he traversed the country in a vintage Chevy Camaro convertible to track down the mom-and-pop restaurantsਊmericathat minted him as a household name. In Fieri’s estimation, he’s visited close to 900 restaurants.

Fieri says that seeing the TV cameras roll up �lt like winning the lottery” for the independent, small-time joints featured on “Triple-D,”਋ut he also realized the broader influence of the show𠅊nd his own on-screen persona𠅊s it went on. “I just remember pulling into a town, and a lady brought her three kids [to where we were filming],” he says. “They all had their hair spiked and sunglasses and were wearing shorts. And I’m like, wait a second. I always wanted to be the Six Million Dollar Man. Now you’ve got kids wanting to be the Diners, Drive-ins and Dives guy.”

[The New York Times Review] wasn’t going to change me. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.

Similar show concepts have existed in the past,਋ut Fieri’s love-it-or-hate-it flair—the moxie to rock frosty tips and forearm sweat bands in the late aughts his easy਌onversational flow and wisecracks his beer-drinking buddy charisma𠅊llowed him to appeal at a much deeper level to millions of Sammy Hagar fans and stay-at-home moms alike. “Honestly, brother, I wish there was something to tell you that was predetermined, or that I have a style,” says Fieri about his sartorial choices. “My style is comfortable.” The same level of comfort extends to his anything-goes approach to cooking—how else would you explain preparing aꂺtch of nachos in a trashcan in front of thousands of fans?

As the show grew in popularity and spawned endless reruns on The Food Network, the cult of Triple-D grew. Catchphrases like 𠇏lavortown” infiltrated every corner of pop culture, and seemingly everyone wanted a piece. Action Bronson and Drake paid small tributes Seth Rogen and James Franco recruited him for The Interview (“That was such a cool thing because you know what it was for? Peace in the Middle East through food.”) Instagram posts from Barry Bonds and 50 Cent made the Internet rounds. All the while, Fieri weathered the Saturday Night Live skitsਊnd relentless meme-ification with such good humor that it practically made him untouchable.

That transcendent Main Street appeal became particularly useful in 2012, when New York Times਌ritic Pete Wells famously used the celebrity chef as a whipping boy in his viral review of Guy Fieri’s Bar + Kitchen in Times Square, setting him up as a representative of all that’s wrong in food. “That wasn’t going to change me,” he says. “I am the way I am and the way I’ve always been. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.”

From family treks into the Marble Mountains, to his days as a charismatic flambé captain,ਏieri shares the 10 dishes that paved his path to Flavortown.


10 Dishes That Made My Career: Guy Fieri

Through more than 70 installments of our 10 Dishes series, we’ve sat down with some of the most illustrious minds in the culinary world and asked them to recount the meals that shaped their careers. Tosi. Boulud. Crenn. Puck. All kings and queens of the kitchen realm. But while we’re intrigued by what makes these leaders of gastronomy tick, we’re equally fascinated by other forms of culinary influence—the fast-food savant who invented stuffed-crust pizza and the McGriddle, for example, and today’s special guest: Guy Fieri. The man who Drake calls “magician in the kitchen” has a direct line to millions of Americans through his ever-popular TV shows, and a burgeoning restaurant empire suggests that Donkey Sauce and BBQ pork sushi rolls aren’t going anywhere soon.

The Nor-Cal native burst onto the scene in 2006 after crushing The Next Food Network Star challenge. But it was his follow-up series—Diners Drive-ins and Dives, in which he traversed the country in a vintage Chevy Camaro convertible to track down the mom-and-pop restaurantsਊmericathat minted him as a household name. In Fieri’s estimation, he’s visited close to 900 restaurants.

Fieri says that seeing the TV cameras roll up �lt like winning the lottery” for the independent, small-time joints featured on “Triple-D,”਋ut he also realized the broader influence of the show𠅊nd his own on-screen persona𠅊s it went on. “I just remember pulling into a town, and a lady brought her three kids [to where we were filming],” he says. “They all had their hair spiked and sunglasses and were wearing shorts. And I’m like, wait a second. I always wanted to be the Six Million Dollar Man. Now you’ve got kids wanting to be the Diners, Drive-ins and Dives guy.”

[The New York Times Review] wasn’t going to change me. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.

Similar show concepts have existed in the past,਋ut Fieri’s love-it-or-hate-it flair—the moxie to rock frosty tips and forearm sweat bands in the late aughts his easy਌onversational flow and wisecracks his beer-drinking buddy charisma𠅊llowed him to appeal at a much deeper level to millions of Sammy Hagar fans and stay-at-home moms alike. “Honestly, brother, I wish there was something to tell you that was predetermined, or that I have a style,” says Fieri about his sartorial choices. “My style is comfortable.” The same level of comfort extends to his anything-goes approach to cooking—how else would you explain preparing aꂺtch of nachos in a trashcan in front of thousands of fans?

As the show grew in popularity and spawned endless reruns on The Food Network, the cult of Triple-D grew. Catchphrases like 𠇏lavortown” infiltrated every corner of pop culture, and seemingly everyone wanted a piece. Action Bronson and Drake paid small tributes Seth Rogen and James Franco recruited him for The Interview (“That was such a cool thing because you know what it was for? Peace in the Middle East through food.”) Instagram posts from Barry Bonds and 50 Cent made the Internet rounds. All the while, Fieri weathered the Saturday Night Live skitsਊnd relentless meme-ification with such good humor that it practically made him untouchable.

That transcendent Main Street appeal became particularly useful in 2012, when New York Times਌ritic Pete Wells famously used the celebrity chef as a whipping boy in his viral review of Guy Fieri’s Bar + Kitchen in Times Square, setting him up as a representative of all that’s wrong in food. “That wasn’t going to change me,” he says. “I am the way I am and the way I’ve always been. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.”

From family treks into the Marble Mountains, to his days as a charismatic flambé captain,ਏieri shares the 10 dishes that paved his path to Flavortown.


10 Dishes That Made My Career: Guy Fieri

Through more than 70 installments of our 10 Dishes series, we’ve sat down with some of the most illustrious minds in the culinary world and asked them to recount the meals that shaped their careers. Tosi. Boulud. Crenn. Puck. All kings and queens of the kitchen realm. But while we’re intrigued by what makes these leaders of gastronomy tick, we’re equally fascinated by other forms of culinary influence—the fast-food savant who invented stuffed-crust pizza and the McGriddle, for example, and today’s special guest: Guy Fieri. The man who Drake calls “magician in the kitchen” has a direct line to millions of Americans through his ever-popular TV shows, and a burgeoning restaurant empire suggests that Donkey Sauce and BBQ pork sushi rolls aren’t going anywhere soon.

The Nor-Cal native burst onto the scene in 2006 after crushing The Next Food Network Star challenge. But it was his follow-up series—Diners Drive-ins and Dives, in which he traversed the country in a vintage Chevy Camaro convertible to track down the mom-and-pop restaurantsਊmericathat minted him as a household name. In Fieri’s estimation, he’s visited close to 900 restaurants.

Fieri says that seeing the TV cameras roll up �lt like winning the lottery” for the independent, small-time joints featured on “Triple-D,”਋ut he also realized the broader influence of the show𠅊nd his own on-screen persona𠅊s it went on. “I just remember pulling into a town, and a lady brought her three kids [to where we were filming],” he says. “They all had their hair spiked and sunglasses and were wearing shorts. And I’m like, wait a second. I always wanted to be the Six Million Dollar Man. Now you’ve got kids wanting to be the Diners, Drive-ins and Dives guy.”

[The New York Times Review] wasn’t going to change me. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.

Similar show concepts have existed in the past,਋ut Fieri’s love-it-or-hate-it flair—the moxie to rock frosty tips and forearm sweat bands in the late aughts his easy਌onversational flow and wisecracks his beer-drinking buddy charisma𠅊llowed him to appeal at a much deeper level to millions of Sammy Hagar fans and stay-at-home moms alike. “Honestly, brother, I wish there was something to tell you that was predetermined, or that I have a style,” says Fieri about his sartorial choices. “My style is comfortable.” The same level of comfort extends to his anything-goes approach to cooking—how else would you explain preparing aꂺtch of nachos in a trashcan in front of thousands of fans?

As the show grew in popularity and spawned endless reruns on The Food Network, the cult of Triple-D grew. Catchphrases like 𠇏lavortown” infiltrated every corner of pop culture, and seemingly everyone wanted a piece. Action Bronson and Drake paid small tributes Seth Rogen and James Franco recruited him for The Interview (“That was such a cool thing because you know what it was for? Peace in the Middle East through food.”) Instagram posts from Barry Bonds and 50 Cent made the Internet rounds. All the while, Fieri weathered the Saturday Night Live skitsਊnd relentless meme-ification with such good humor that it practically made him untouchable.

That transcendent Main Street appeal became particularly useful in 2012, when New York Times਌ritic Pete Wells famously used the celebrity chef as a whipping boy in his viral review of Guy Fieri’s Bar + Kitchen in Times Square, setting him up as a representative of all that’s wrong in food. “That wasn’t going to change me,” he says. “I am the way I am and the way I’ve always been. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.”

From family treks into the Marble Mountains, to his days as a charismatic flambé captain,ਏieri shares the 10 dishes that paved his path to Flavortown.


10 Dishes That Made My Career: Guy Fieri

Through more than 70 installments of our 10 Dishes series, we’ve sat down with some of the most illustrious minds in the culinary world and asked them to recount the meals that shaped their careers. Tosi. Boulud. Crenn. Puck. All kings and queens of the kitchen realm. But while we’re intrigued by what makes these leaders of gastronomy tick, we’re equally fascinated by other forms of culinary influence—the fast-food savant who invented stuffed-crust pizza and the McGriddle, for example, and today’s special guest: Guy Fieri. The man who Drake calls “magician in the kitchen” has a direct line to millions of Americans through his ever-popular TV shows, and a burgeoning restaurant empire suggests that Donkey Sauce and BBQ pork sushi rolls aren’t going anywhere soon.

The Nor-Cal native burst onto the scene in 2006 after crushing The Next Food Network Star challenge. But it was his follow-up series—Diners Drive-ins and Dives, in which he traversed the country in a vintage Chevy Camaro convertible to track down the mom-and-pop restaurantsਊmericathat minted him as a household name. In Fieri’s estimation, he’s visited close to 900 restaurants.

Fieri says that seeing the TV cameras roll up �lt like winning the lottery” for the independent, small-time joints featured on “Triple-D,”਋ut he also realized the broader influence of the show𠅊nd his own on-screen persona𠅊s it went on. “I just remember pulling into a town, and a lady brought her three kids [to where we were filming],” he says. “They all had their hair spiked and sunglasses and were wearing shorts. And I’m like, wait a second. I always wanted to be the Six Million Dollar Man. Now you’ve got kids wanting to be the Diners, Drive-ins and Dives guy.”

[The New York Times Review] wasn’t going to change me. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.

Similar show concepts have existed in the past,਋ut Fieri’s love-it-or-hate-it flair—the moxie to rock frosty tips and forearm sweat bands in the late aughts his easy਌onversational flow and wisecracks his beer-drinking buddy charisma𠅊llowed him to appeal at a much deeper level to millions of Sammy Hagar fans and stay-at-home moms alike. “Honestly, brother, I wish there was something to tell you that was predetermined, or that I have a style,” says Fieri about his sartorial choices. “My style is comfortable.” The same level of comfort extends to his anything-goes approach to cooking—how else would you explain preparing aꂺtch of nachos in a trashcan in front of thousands of fans?

As the show grew in popularity and spawned endless reruns on The Food Network, the cult of Triple-D grew. Catchphrases like 𠇏lavortown” infiltrated every corner of pop culture, and seemingly everyone wanted a piece. Action Bronson and Drake paid small tributes Seth Rogen and James Franco recruited him for The Interview (“That was such a cool thing because you know what it was for? Peace in the Middle East through food.”) Instagram posts from Barry Bonds and 50 Cent made the Internet rounds. All the while, Fieri weathered the Saturday Night Live skitsਊnd relentless meme-ification with such good humor that it practically made him untouchable.

That transcendent Main Street appeal became particularly useful in 2012, when New York Times਌ritic Pete Wells famously used the celebrity chef as a whipping boy in his viral review of Guy Fieri’s Bar + Kitchen in Times Square, setting him up as a representative of all that’s wrong in food. “That wasn’t going to change me,” he says. “I am the way I am and the way I’ve always been. I’ve opened six restaurants since then.”

From family treks into the Marble Mountains, to his days as a charismatic flambé captain,ਏieri shares the 10 dishes that paved his path to Flavortown.


Watch the video: Guy Fieri Tries Brazilian Food Truck Recommended By Matthew McConaughey. Diners, Drive-Ins u0026 Dives (July 2022).


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