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Kraft-Heinz Is Giving Its Employees the Day Off Instead of Doing a Super Bowl Ad

Kraft-Heinz Is Giving Its Employees the Day Off Instead of Doing a Super Bowl Ad


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In a largely publicized move, Kraft-Heinz is hoping for a big win with this cheaper decision

Saving $5 million on a paid holiday for all employees sounds like a great deal.

Forget the actual big game; when it comes to the Super Bowl, everyone wants to catch the funniest and most heartwarming commercials. But this year, Kraft-Heinz is opting out of a $5 million Super Bowl advertising spot. Instead, if the company gets enough signatures on this petition, it’ll spend that money on a company-wide holiday for all employees the day after the Super Bowl.

The genius idea is getting so much publicity that it might have been a smarter and cheaper move than whatever the next “puppy-monkey-baby” gimmick would be.

“We wanted to get behind an initiative that we know people feel strongly about,” said Nicole Kulwicki, a marketing executive at Kraft-Heinz, told Bloomberg. Kraft-Heinz makes such iconic brands as Heinz ketchup, Easy Mac, Oscar Mayer, and Jell-O, and it employs 42,000 people.

Last year, Kraft-Heinz’s big commercial featured dachshunds dressed as hot dogs running in a meadow.

This isn’t the first time a company has forsaken ad revenue in favor of employee benefits. Every year, Hershey runs the same holiday commercial and instead spends the advertising money on Christmas bonuses.


Just when you thought Windows Phone couldn’t get any more dead…

Generally speaking, Windows Phone is not doing super well in its quest to be a viable smartphone platform. It’s not that the operating system is broken or even bad — though one could argue the latter — it’s just that nobody really seems to want to use it. We rarely get any hard numbers on just how many Windows Phone devices Microsoft is managing to sell, but in its earnings call today the company did show its hand a bit, and things aren’t looking great.

Buried in its overall positive earnings report, Microsoft noted that its revenue grouping labeled “More Personal Computing” dipped roughly five percent year over year, and that it was “driven primarily by lower phone revenue.” Just how much lower? The company reported that revenue from phones declined by a whopping 81 percent, which figures to be right around $880 million.

There are a few factors that play into that huge drop. For starters, Microsoft’s market share in smartphones has been in a downward spiral for many, many months now. As of the latest IDC report, Windows Phone represents just 0.3 percent of the smartphone market. At the end of 2015, the platform had 1.2 percent market share. On top of that, Microsoft just got done selling off its feature phone business — which uses the Nokia branding — to Foxconn. That transaction finalized in November, and likely played a part in the overall dive in phone revenue, but it’s still not looking great for Windows mobile devices.

Microsoft has said it wants to reorganize its smartphone efforts and still plans to try to make Windows Phone a thing. At this point, it’s hard to know whether that’s a wise move or not.


Just when you thought Windows Phone couldn’t get any more dead…

Generally speaking, Windows Phone is not doing super well in its quest to be a viable smartphone platform. It’s not that the operating system is broken or even bad — though one could argue the latter — it’s just that nobody really seems to want to use it. We rarely get any hard numbers on just how many Windows Phone devices Microsoft is managing to sell, but in its earnings call today the company did show its hand a bit, and things aren’t looking great.

Buried in its overall positive earnings report, Microsoft noted that its revenue grouping labeled “More Personal Computing” dipped roughly five percent year over year, and that it was “driven primarily by lower phone revenue.” Just how much lower? The company reported that revenue from phones declined by a whopping 81 percent, which figures to be right around $880 million.

There are a few factors that play into that huge drop. For starters, Microsoft’s market share in smartphones has been in a downward spiral for many, many months now. As of the latest IDC report, Windows Phone represents just 0.3 percent of the smartphone market. At the end of 2015, the platform had 1.2 percent market share. On top of that, Microsoft just got done selling off its feature phone business — which uses the Nokia branding — to Foxconn. That transaction finalized in November, and likely played a part in the overall dive in phone revenue, but it’s still not looking great for Windows mobile devices.

Microsoft has said it wants to reorganize its smartphone efforts and still plans to try to make Windows Phone a thing. At this point, it’s hard to know whether that’s a wise move or not.


Just when you thought Windows Phone couldn’t get any more dead…

Generally speaking, Windows Phone is not doing super well in its quest to be a viable smartphone platform. It’s not that the operating system is broken or even bad — though one could argue the latter — it’s just that nobody really seems to want to use it. We rarely get any hard numbers on just how many Windows Phone devices Microsoft is managing to sell, but in its earnings call today the company did show its hand a bit, and things aren’t looking great.

Buried in its overall positive earnings report, Microsoft noted that its revenue grouping labeled “More Personal Computing” dipped roughly five percent year over year, and that it was “driven primarily by lower phone revenue.” Just how much lower? The company reported that revenue from phones declined by a whopping 81 percent, which figures to be right around $880 million.

There are a few factors that play into that huge drop. For starters, Microsoft’s market share in smartphones has been in a downward spiral for many, many months now. As of the latest IDC report, Windows Phone represents just 0.3 percent of the smartphone market. At the end of 2015, the platform had 1.2 percent market share. On top of that, Microsoft just got done selling off its feature phone business — which uses the Nokia branding — to Foxconn. That transaction finalized in November, and likely played a part in the overall dive in phone revenue, but it’s still not looking great for Windows mobile devices.

Microsoft has said it wants to reorganize its smartphone efforts and still plans to try to make Windows Phone a thing. At this point, it’s hard to know whether that’s a wise move or not.


Just when you thought Windows Phone couldn’t get any more dead…

Generally speaking, Windows Phone is not doing super well in its quest to be a viable smartphone platform. It’s not that the operating system is broken or even bad — though one could argue the latter — it’s just that nobody really seems to want to use it. We rarely get any hard numbers on just how many Windows Phone devices Microsoft is managing to sell, but in its earnings call today the company did show its hand a bit, and things aren’t looking great.

Buried in its overall positive earnings report, Microsoft noted that its revenue grouping labeled “More Personal Computing” dipped roughly five percent year over year, and that it was “driven primarily by lower phone revenue.” Just how much lower? The company reported that revenue from phones declined by a whopping 81 percent, which figures to be right around $880 million.

There are a few factors that play into that huge drop. For starters, Microsoft’s market share in smartphones has been in a downward spiral for many, many months now. As of the latest IDC report, Windows Phone represents just 0.3 percent of the smartphone market. At the end of 2015, the platform had 1.2 percent market share. On top of that, Microsoft just got done selling off its feature phone business — which uses the Nokia branding — to Foxconn. That transaction finalized in November, and likely played a part in the overall dive in phone revenue, but it’s still not looking great for Windows mobile devices.

Microsoft has said it wants to reorganize its smartphone efforts and still plans to try to make Windows Phone a thing. At this point, it’s hard to know whether that’s a wise move or not.


Just when you thought Windows Phone couldn’t get any more dead…

Generally speaking, Windows Phone is not doing super well in its quest to be a viable smartphone platform. It’s not that the operating system is broken or even bad — though one could argue the latter — it’s just that nobody really seems to want to use it. We rarely get any hard numbers on just how many Windows Phone devices Microsoft is managing to sell, but in its earnings call today the company did show its hand a bit, and things aren’t looking great.

Buried in its overall positive earnings report, Microsoft noted that its revenue grouping labeled “More Personal Computing” dipped roughly five percent year over year, and that it was “driven primarily by lower phone revenue.” Just how much lower? The company reported that revenue from phones declined by a whopping 81 percent, which figures to be right around $880 million.

There are a few factors that play into that huge drop. For starters, Microsoft’s market share in smartphones has been in a downward spiral for many, many months now. As of the latest IDC report, Windows Phone represents just 0.3 percent of the smartphone market. At the end of 2015, the platform had 1.2 percent market share. On top of that, Microsoft just got done selling off its feature phone business — which uses the Nokia branding — to Foxconn. That transaction finalized in November, and likely played a part in the overall dive in phone revenue, but it’s still not looking great for Windows mobile devices.

Microsoft has said it wants to reorganize its smartphone efforts and still plans to try to make Windows Phone a thing. At this point, it’s hard to know whether that’s a wise move or not.


Just when you thought Windows Phone couldn’t get any more dead…

Generally speaking, Windows Phone is not doing super well in its quest to be a viable smartphone platform. It’s not that the operating system is broken or even bad — though one could argue the latter — it’s just that nobody really seems to want to use it. We rarely get any hard numbers on just how many Windows Phone devices Microsoft is managing to sell, but in its earnings call today the company did show its hand a bit, and things aren’t looking great.

Buried in its overall positive earnings report, Microsoft noted that its revenue grouping labeled “More Personal Computing” dipped roughly five percent year over year, and that it was “driven primarily by lower phone revenue.” Just how much lower? The company reported that revenue from phones declined by a whopping 81 percent, which figures to be right around $880 million.

There are a few factors that play into that huge drop. For starters, Microsoft’s market share in smartphones has been in a downward spiral for many, many months now. As of the latest IDC report, Windows Phone represents just 0.3 percent of the smartphone market. At the end of 2015, the platform had 1.2 percent market share. On top of that, Microsoft just got done selling off its feature phone business — which uses the Nokia branding — to Foxconn. That transaction finalized in November, and likely played a part in the overall dive in phone revenue, but it’s still not looking great for Windows mobile devices.

Microsoft has said it wants to reorganize its smartphone efforts and still plans to try to make Windows Phone a thing. At this point, it’s hard to know whether that’s a wise move or not.


Just when you thought Windows Phone couldn’t get any more dead…

Generally speaking, Windows Phone is not doing super well in its quest to be a viable smartphone platform. It’s not that the operating system is broken or even bad — though one could argue the latter — it’s just that nobody really seems to want to use it. We rarely get any hard numbers on just how many Windows Phone devices Microsoft is managing to sell, but in its earnings call today the company did show its hand a bit, and things aren’t looking great.

Buried in its overall positive earnings report, Microsoft noted that its revenue grouping labeled “More Personal Computing” dipped roughly five percent year over year, and that it was “driven primarily by lower phone revenue.” Just how much lower? The company reported that revenue from phones declined by a whopping 81 percent, which figures to be right around $880 million.

There are a few factors that play into that huge drop. For starters, Microsoft’s market share in smartphones has been in a downward spiral for many, many months now. As of the latest IDC report, Windows Phone represents just 0.3 percent of the smartphone market. At the end of 2015, the platform had 1.2 percent market share. On top of that, Microsoft just got done selling off its feature phone business — which uses the Nokia branding — to Foxconn. That transaction finalized in November, and likely played a part in the overall dive in phone revenue, but it’s still not looking great for Windows mobile devices.

Microsoft has said it wants to reorganize its smartphone efforts and still plans to try to make Windows Phone a thing. At this point, it’s hard to know whether that’s a wise move or not.


Just when you thought Windows Phone couldn’t get any more dead…

Generally speaking, Windows Phone is not doing super well in its quest to be a viable smartphone platform. It’s not that the operating system is broken or even bad — though one could argue the latter — it’s just that nobody really seems to want to use it. We rarely get any hard numbers on just how many Windows Phone devices Microsoft is managing to sell, but in its earnings call today the company did show its hand a bit, and things aren’t looking great.

Buried in its overall positive earnings report, Microsoft noted that its revenue grouping labeled “More Personal Computing” dipped roughly five percent year over year, and that it was “driven primarily by lower phone revenue.” Just how much lower? The company reported that revenue from phones declined by a whopping 81 percent, which figures to be right around $880 million.

There are a few factors that play into that huge drop. For starters, Microsoft’s market share in smartphones has been in a downward spiral for many, many months now. As of the latest IDC report, Windows Phone represents just 0.3 percent of the smartphone market. At the end of 2015, the platform had 1.2 percent market share. On top of that, Microsoft just got done selling off its feature phone business — which uses the Nokia branding — to Foxconn. That transaction finalized in November, and likely played a part in the overall dive in phone revenue, but it’s still not looking great for Windows mobile devices.

Microsoft has said it wants to reorganize its smartphone efforts and still plans to try to make Windows Phone a thing. At this point, it’s hard to know whether that’s a wise move or not.


Just when you thought Windows Phone couldn’t get any more dead…

Generally speaking, Windows Phone is not doing super well in its quest to be a viable smartphone platform. It’s not that the operating system is broken or even bad — though one could argue the latter — it’s just that nobody really seems to want to use it. We rarely get any hard numbers on just how many Windows Phone devices Microsoft is managing to sell, but in its earnings call today the company did show its hand a bit, and things aren’t looking great.

Buried in its overall positive earnings report, Microsoft noted that its revenue grouping labeled “More Personal Computing” dipped roughly five percent year over year, and that it was “driven primarily by lower phone revenue.” Just how much lower? The company reported that revenue from phones declined by a whopping 81 percent, which figures to be right around $880 million.

There are a few factors that play into that huge drop. For starters, Microsoft’s market share in smartphones has been in a downward spiral for many, many months now. As of the latest IDC report, Windows Phone represents just 0.3 percent of the smartphone market. At the end of 2015, the platform had 1.2 percent market share. On top of that, Microsoft just got done selling off its feature phone business — which uses the Nokia branding — to Foxconn. That transaction finalized in November, and likely played a part in the overall dive in phone revenue, but it’s still not looking great for Windows mobile devices.

Microsoft has said it wants to reorganize its smartphone efforts and still plans to try to make Windows Phone a thing. At this point, it’s hard to know whether that’s a wise move or not.


Just when you thought Windows Phone couldn’t get any more dead…

Generally speaking, Windows Phone is not doing super well in its quest to be a viable smartphone platform. It’s not that the operating system is broken or even bad — though one could argue the latter — it’s just that nobody really seems to want to use it. We rarely get any hard numbers on just how many Windows Phone devices Microsoft is managing to sell, but in its earnings call today the company did show its hand a bit, and things aren’t looking great.

Buried in its overall positive earnings report, Microsoft noted that its revenue grouping labeled “More Personal Computing” dipped roughly five percent year over year, and that it was “driven primarily by lower phone revenue.” Just how much lower? The company reported that revenue from phones declined by a whopping 81 percent, which figures to be right around $880 million.

There are a few factors that play into that huge drop. For starters, Microsoft’s market share in smartphones has been in a downward spiral for many, many months now. As of the latest IDC report, Windows Phone represents just 0.3 percent of the smartphone market. At the end of 2015, the platform had 1.2 percent market share. On top of that, Microsoft just got done selling off its feature phone business — which uses the Nokia branding — to Foxconn. That transaction finalized in November, and likely played a part in the overall dive in phone revenue, but it’s still not looking great for Windows mobile devices.

Microsoft has said it wants to reorganize its smartphone efforts and still plans to try to make Windows Phone a thing. At this point, it’s hard to know whether that’s a wise move or not.


Watch the video: The Rise and Fall of Kraft Heinz: Business Case Study Explained (May 2022).